Print Page | Sign In | Join NCRPA
The NC Recre8'er - News, Insight and Tips for Recreation and Parks Professionals
Blog Home All Blogs
The NC Recre8'er - is the Blog for NC Recreation and Parks Professionals. We will feature posts from NCRPA members and staff about all the latest news, insights and tips in our field and around the state. Topics will include but are not limited to: Health and Wellness, Outdoor Recreation, Athletics, Advocacy, Aquatics, Therapeutic Recreation, Special Events, Marketing, Parks and Greenways, Cultural Resources and more! If you are interested in being a guest blogger please contact Matt at NCRPA Matt@ncrpa.net or 919-832-5868. The opinions of The NC Recre8'er (NCRPA) blog contributors don't necessarily reflect the editorial position of North Carolina Recreation and Park Association as a whole.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Wellness  Recreation  parks  NCRPA Wellness  50at50  NCRPA  Healthy Living  young professionals  Health  ypn  Wellness bulletin  healthy eating  #Ncrecre8  fitness  NRPA  Health and Wellness  Programs  Tips  Blogs  Community Gardens  DiscoverNCParks  professional development  Family  Organization  Youth Programs  Active Lifestyle  Awareness  Association  Community Building  conference 

YPN Blog: September 2018

Posted By Nicole Miller, PNC Arena / Carolina Hurricanes, Thursday, September 6, 2018

Decisions, Decisions

Life is all about choices. We make small choices every day and usually don't think twice about them. What to have for lunch, should I have another cup of coffee (not that this is really a choice, seeing as the answer is always a resounding yes), what should I do when I get home from work. All simple decisions that carry little weight in the grand scheme of things. However, sometimes our decisions are bigger, especially when they come to our career.

One of the most important lessons I have learned when it comes to decisions about your career has nothing to do with actually making the decision but rather how you move forward once you have made it. Lean into your decision and give it your best. This starts as early on as choosing your major in college. You're young; you don't necessarily know what you want to do with your life, but, by the end of your sophomore year, you're made a major choice. When I decided to major in Sport and Event Management, I had no idea what I wanted to do after graduation, but I knew that I needed to give my classes my all and create the best future opportunities for myself, regardless of what I thought I wanted those to be.

When I applied for my job at NCRPA, I gave the interviews my all. I got insight from my current supervisor and mentor about the organization, studied everything I could on NCRPA's website, and practiced answering all of the classic interview questions I could think of. Deciding to take this job and move to Raleigh was easy. Once I got to Raleigh, I put my all into my job from Day 1. I was a brand new young professional, and I was eager to learn as much as I could and make the most out of the opportunity at hand. The NCRPA Fellow is designed as a one or two year position for a young professional to help them grow and develop a variety of essential professional skills and experiences. This meant that I had a set amount of time before I would have to make yet another big career decision.

Two years flew by and suddenly it was decision time. Time to decide what type of job I wanted to pursue next, where to apply, where I saw myself 5-10 years in future. As I was applying for jobs, I heard from a professor at Elon, my alma mater, regarding an opportunity for a job that was outside of the parks and recreation or non-profit field, where I had envisioned myself continuing my career. I decided to apply, and after going through the interview process, I was offered the position. Suddenly, I had a major decision to make. Thankfully, I have an amazing support team of friends, family, peers and mentors to discuss my choice with plus a propensity for wanting to know as much information as possible (hello, pro/con list). Ultimately, the decision was mine to make, and I knew that I no matter what I decided I needed to move forward with that decision with confidence

 I decided to accept the offer, and I will begin my new position in just a couple of weeks. Am I 100% confident in my decision, maybe not - decisions this big are scary, but that isn't going to stop me from taking all my of lessons and experiences that I have gained in my past two years and giving my new job my absolute best. Anything less would be a disservice to my new employer, NCRPA, and, most importantly, myself - and doing that was never a choice.


Meet the Author

Nicole joined NCRPA in 2016, relocating from Atlanta, GA. She graduated from Elon University with a Bachelor’s degree in Sport and Event Management, with Minors in Business Administration and Psychology. She has previously worked for Graham Recreation and Parks as an Athletics Intern during her time at Elon, and she interned for the Burlington Royals Minor League Baseball team in summer 2015. In her free time, Nicole volunteers with the SPCA of Wake County, is involved with the Triangle Civitan Club, and keeps the local Bruegger’s Bagels in business (one everything bagel and iced coffee please!).

 If you are interested in being a guest author for the YPN Blog, please contact Nicole at nicole@ncrpa.net or 919-832-5868.

Tags:  professional development  young professionals  ypn 

Share |
Permalink
 

YPN Blog: August 2018

Posted By Coult Culler, North Carolina Recreation and Park Association, Thursday, August 2, 2018
Updated: Monday, July 30, 2018

Staying Connected


Hello fellow young professionals! My name is Coult Culler, and I am the current summer intern here at the North Carolina Recreation and Park Association (NCRPA). After completing my internship, I will officially be a North Carolina State University graduate. I am graduating with a Bachelor’s of Science in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management with a concentration in Natural Resources. My time here at NCRPA has allowed me to sharpen my profession skills, learn new ones, and most importantly meet some great people. In this month's YPN blog, I will discuss the importance of staying connected with past friends, classmates, professors, and other contacts.


Over the course of my four years in college, I was able to meet hundreds of individuals. Some of whom I now consider to be my best friends and will always keep in touch with them no matter where we end up in life. Others I have met were classmates, coaches, teacher assistants, and professors. It has taken me until this point to realize how important it is to stay connected with them. Staying connected has the potential to open doors and create new opportunities that may never have come around without the help of an old friend.


After finishing your general college classes, you are able to move into your major-specific classes. In these classes, you start to meet fellow classmates that more than likely share similar career goals as you do and partake in the same extracurricular activities. It is scary how fast those four years can fly by, and people start getting jobs and going their separate ways. After those four years, people have more than likely shared contact information or are friends on social media of some sort. Taking advantage of that information may benefit you more than you think. If you are currently working a job and have already started looking for new ones, or you are still on the search for either a part-time or full-time job, take advantage of the contacts you have access to. Your classmates may be in a position to help you find a job or even offer you a position at their current organization.


A lot of us had a favorite professor that taught multiple classes related to our major. He or she was able to get to know who you are from your assignments, projects, papers and other school-related content. They were also able to see you grow as a person over a couple of years. Professors are there to share their knowledge with young professionals that strive to make a difference in the world no matter where they may end up working. But looking down the road, they are there to help you even if you are not in school anymore. Professors have an endless book of connections that may assist you in the job search. When you are stressing about your current employment position and where to go from there, don’t hesitate to send that email. The connection with past teachers and professors goes past the classroom doors. Reaching out for advice or suggestions is something that they would be happy to share with you.


During my final year at NC State, I started to become stressed about finding an internship. I spent hours looking and applying but was unable to hear back from anyone. I finally ended up reaching out to my advisor who I had become close with over the years. Thankfully, she was able to give me a couple of leads to different places that had internships available around the Raleigh area. I ended up applying for the position with NCRPA later that day. Not too long after applying, I received an email back from NCRPA asking when I could come in for an interview. I immediately sent my advisor an email saying thank you for all of her help because without it I may have never gotten the internship. That just goes to show that building relationships with people over the years can benefit you in tough situations.             


My time at NC State was more than anything I could have asked for because of the people I met and the education I received. Now moving forward as a young professional, I am able to see the unwritten side of the real world. It is up to us to find a profession we have a passion for, but that is a lot easier said than done. Take advantage of the friends and contacts you have made over the years because you never know how they could positively impact your future.


 Meet the Author

 

Coult joined NCRPA this summer as an intern and is a native of Wilmington, North Carolina. He is planning on graduating from North Carolina State University at the end of this summer with a Bachelor's of Science in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management with a concentration in Natural Resources. Coult lives in Raleigh and enjoys making trips back to Wilmington to fish and be on the water.

 

Coult can be reached at ccculler@ncsu.edu or 919-832-5868.

  

 If you are interested in being a guest author for the YPN Blog, please contact Nicole at nicole@ncrpa.net or 919-832-5868.

Tags:  connections  intern  internship  networking  professional development  young professionals  ypn 

Share |
Permalink
 

YPN Blog: June 2018

Posted By Emma Griffin, Carrboro Recreation and Parks, Thursday, June 7, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Now What?

So, you’ve finished college, completed your internship, and finally got your first “real” job…now what? When I was in college, we were guided and coached on getting our first full-time job. I had always told myself I needed to stay in that job for 3 - 5 years to establish a good reputation, get my foot in the door, and to show loyalty and dedication. No one wants to look like a “job hopper,” right? But what is our next step? When is the “right” time to start looking for your next job?

That is the question I faced this past year. I had been working at Southern Pines Recreation and Parks Department for almost 4 years as the Senior Programs/Special Events Coordinator. I loved my job. I loved my coworkers. I had an amazing and supportive boss. Why would I ever leave? But then I found myself looking and keeping an eye out for job openings through NCRPA's Career Connection more and more often. And finally one day, it just clicked. I saw a job posted that I thought would be perfect for me, more specialized, and closer to home. After almost 4 ½ years working in Southern Pines, I made the decision to accept the job as Recreation Supervisor (Signature Events) for the Carrboro Recreation and Parks Department. I am not someone who typically likes change and I usually feel more comfortable in a familiar setting, but I was ready to accept the challenge and see what this new job had to offer and where it could take me in my career. Still the question begs, do you ever really “know” or are you just taking a leap of faith hoping it works out? I like to think it’s a little bit of both.

When considering the “right” time to look for a new job opportunity, remember that the right time for me probably won’t feel like the right time for you. Everyone is going to have different motivating factors for moving onward and upward in their career. What were mine? Simple, my family and growth in my career. While I had been working in Southern Pines for over 4 years, I had been living in Alamance County (Eli Whitney to be exact) during that time as well. For those of you not familiar with the area, it was a solid 1-hour drive to work every day. When my daughter was born and I returned to work in December 2016, my morning drive turned into two hours by the time I took her to the babysitter (plus the hour drive home at night). Yeah, the drive was awful but I had gotten very accustomed to it since I had also commuted over 45 minutes to UNC-Greensboro for 3 years. For me and my husband, it was worth it to us to live in the area we wanted, near family and friends, and for me to have a job I enjoyed and loved. That alone made the drive worth it. Even though I thoroughly believed my job was worth the long drive, I knew I would be crazy to pass up an opportunity to work 20 minutes from home.

I also firmly believe that it is necessary to always be learning, growing, and pushing yourself in this field in order to be the best Recreation Professional possible. If you become complacent, content, or just don’t feel challenged anymore, then you risk losing what makes our profession so special…your passion. In my last position in Southern Pines, I was fortunate to always be given the opportunity (and encouraged) to try new things and push myself. However, I felt myself slowly getting into a slump of just being happy with how my events and programs were going and not as excited to continue to make them grow and improve. That was another sign for me that it may be time to look for new opportunities in a place that I could challenge myself. Carrboro is a very unique town with an even more diverse and unique population. They offer larger scale events and programs to the community than in past departments I have worked in. The challenge and opportunity to be part of something like that made me excited (and a little nervous)!

Unfortunately, there isn’t an easy answer. There isn’t a formula. I can’t lay it out step by step to tell you when it’s time to look for a new job. What I can tell you is, always know your own priorities and understand the pros and cons of your decision. I’ve been working in Carrboro for about 3 months now and when I was approached about writing for this blog, the idea for this topic came to me pretty easily since it is very relevant in what I have just experienced. But I found while writing this, that there’s probably a reason we never talked about this much in school, because there isn’t a “one size fits all” solution or answer to navigating your career.


Meet the Author

Emma Griffin obtained her Bachelor’s in Recreation and Parks Management with a concentration in Community Recreation and Event Planning and a Sociology Minor from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 2013. During college, she worked part time and as a practicum and intern student at Gibsonville Parks and Recreation for 1.5 years, where she developed her passion for the field of public recreation. Emma worked as the Senior Programs and Special Events Coordinator for 4.5 years for Southern Pines Recreation and Parks. She recently began her job as Recreation Supervisor for Carrboro Recreation and Parks in March 2018. When she is not working, Emma enjoys spending time with her husband, Jay, daughter, Lilah, and friends and family. Emma loves taking walks, visiting local parks, and taking vacations at historical sites.

 

Emma can be reached at egriffin@townofcarrboro.org or 919-918-7367.

 

If you are interested in being a guest author for the YPN Blog, please contact Nicole at nicole@ncrpa.net or 919-832-5868.

Tags:  career advancement  professional development  young professionals  ypn 

Share |
Permalink
 

YPN Blog: May 2018

Posted By Chris Allen, Rocky Mount Parks and Recreation, Thursday, May 3, 2018
Updated: Monday, April 30, 2018

The beginning of each year highlights National Mentoring Month, when we applaud the dedicated individuals that give their time and experience to benefit others.  After all, mentoring offers so many professional and personal benefits for people of all ages and backgrounds. According to the National Mentoring Partnership, of individuals that obtain mentors during any point in their professional careers, 90% are interested in becoming a mentor themselves and 130% are likely to be placed in leadership roles within their organization.  By preparing young professionals and advanced professionals alike, mentorship helps develop the future workplace talent pipeline. Mentors can help their mentees with their professional careers and assist with their workplace skills, so it is important that mentees sure their selected mentor has their best interest in mind when pursuing a mentor-mentee relationship.

Before you start having recurring nightmares of Farnsworth Bentley holding Sean “Diddy” Combs’ umbrella, mentors aren't just for reality television stars. A mentor is an individual that helps guide your development professionally and sometimes personally. In an increasingly competitive job market, a good mentor might be just what you need - whether you're a recent graduate or an experienced professional in your field and looking to make the next move. Before making that move, consider why you want a mentor. Mentors can be useful whether you are stagnate at your position or in a transitional period. A mentoring relationship should not be entered for its own sake. When looking for a mentor, don’t forget to consider finding one in your existing network. There are plenty of ways to find a mentor, but through your network on- and offline can sometimes be the best avenue. Once you have selected a mentor, make sure you are upfront about your goals and how those goals will be measured. It is important to develop the right mentor-mentee chemistry to ensure a successful relationship. As a reminder, a good mentor could be the catalyst that takes you to your desired position, so maintaining a good relationship could save stress to both parties.

So, to the professionals that are searching for mentors, be sure to take your time with your selection. It could be the difference between just working for a department or one day potentially becoming the department director.


Meet the Author

Chris “Ross” Allen originally from Wake Forest, NC, obtained his Bachelor’s in Athletic Administration from North Carolina Central University and his Master’s in Sports Management from the same university.  Chris has worked for the town of Wake Forest as Maintenance Specialist and the City of Durham as a Recreation Specialist. He is currently the Recreation Coordinator for the City of Rocky Mount. Chris is currently a board member for the National Recreation and Park Ethnic Minority Society while also serving as a Region Chair with the North Carolina Recreation and Park Association.

Chris can be reached at chris.allen@rockymountnc.gov or 252.972.1170

 

If you are interested in being a guest author for the YPN Blog, please contact Nicole at nicole@ncrpa.net or 919-832-5868.

Tags:  mentor  mentorship  professional development  young professionals  ypn 

Share |
Permalink
 

YPN Blog: January 2018

Posted By Malik Diggs, UNC-Greensboro & Greensboro Parks and Recreation, Thursday, January 4, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Finding value in experiences you have with people and within programs is a tool that takes you a long way. Growing up, I always wanted to be a physical therapist, but when I got to college and began studying Kinesiology, that quickly changed. My first semester was over, and I was stuck not knowing what I wanted to major in - let alone my career choice. Young-minded and confused, I remembered my first real job with Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation at Bette Rae Thomas Recreation Center under the award-winning, Recreation Employment Corp, or R.E.C., program. R.E.C. is a work-based learning program employing youth between the ages of 14-17 as employees/mentors at neighborhood recreation centers, nature centers and aquatic facilities. During my time there, I learned lessons about making a change, the impact the smallest interactions can make and overall how recreation can guide youth to better lives and adults to a more self-fulfilling one. That experience served as a precursor to what eventually would become my career, which explains why I am here today.

As fortunate as I was to have that past experience, the learning didn’t stop there. This year was my first time attending the Carolinas Joint Conference, and it was one of the most eye-opening and richest experiences I’ve ever had. The amount of knowledge gained, the people I met and conference as whole provided an immeasurable amount of joy and value. I met people who I now look to as motivation to keep pushing myself in the field of Park and Recreation because they shared stories and knowledge with me that I hope to one day attain. Along with knowledge gained, connections were renewed. I reunited with Terri Stowers, who recognized me from my time in the R.E.C. program; overwhelmed with joy, we discussed how impactful the program was for me and how she, along with the Bette Rae staff, impacted my decision to pursue a career in Park and Recreation. The joint conference is a highlight in my young career and an event I would highly recommend young professionals like myself to attend.

Now, I’m currently a Recreation Assistant for the Greensboro Parks and Recreation Department and student at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. I’m taking the knowledge gained at school and bringing it into my career. You really start to see the impact of experiences gained whether it be via school or another professional. A great personal example came after taking CTR-314, or Recreation Services with Underrepresented Groups, with Dr. Schleien, a marvelous professor. I feel I gained the ability to view facilities and situations through a lens of inclusion, so now anywhere I go, I’m always looking for a way to adapt activities and facilities to make them more accessible to everyone. Along with that experience, my curriculum and professors will offer many more lessons that will help me attain more skills that will prove worthy in my career.

Discovering my love for recreation was truly a blessing and helped me figure out what’s been right in front of my face the whole time - that Park and Recreation was my calling. Finding value in the experiences I’ve had since the age of 14 has made it easier for me to turn my knowledge into actions. It’s easy to talk the talk, but through enriching experiences, plus knowledge and lessons and with the help of the Greensboro Parks and Recreation department along with my facility director, Gina Carmon, I will become equipped with tools that will help me walk the walk. Therefore, professionals, whether you are 3 months or 20 years into your career, I challenge you to take the interactions you hold dear and turn them into outeractions in order to make a needed change in your community.  Make the change you know is needed, and be the difference you want to see.


Meet the Author

Malik Diggs is currently a student at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and a Recreation Assistant with Greensboro Parks and Recreation Department. He is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Recreation and Parks Management with a concentration in Community Recreation and Event Planning. He hopes to one day become a Director of Park and Recreation, but is taking it day-by-day while taking advantage of opportunities presented to him. He’s a proud dog dad of a Morkie by the name of Milo. His favorite quote is by Michelangelo: “Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it.” He challenges you to push the envelope and make a change. Malik can be reached at mddiggs2@uncg.edu.

 

 

 If you are interested in being a guest author for the YPN Blog, please contact Nicole at nicole@ncrpa.net or 919-832-5868.

Tags:  professional development  Programs  young professionals  ypn 

Share |
Permalink
 

YPN Blog: November 2017

Posted By Joseph Keel, Siler City Parks and Recreation, Thursday, November 9, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, October 18, 2017

From playing the game to leading the game

Parks and Recreation Professionals,

After graduating from Mars Hill University, I had one goal: to become a member of a professional parks and recreation agency.  After a month of interviewing, hard work and determination in finding the right fit for me, I accepted the Athletic Coordinator position with Aberdeen Parks and Recreation. It wasn’t long after being in Parks and Recreation that I decided I wanted to be a Parks and Recreation Director one day. With new career goals set, I took every advantage to learn the ins and outs of the Parks and Recreation field. I took leadership roles in the State Wide Athletics Committee (SWAC) and the NCRPA Athletics Directors Workshop (ADW). I worked closely with Aberdeen's Parks and Recreation Director to see what goes on outside of athletics. 

I attended sessions at NCRPA State Conference and ADW that directly correlated with my goal of being a Parks and Recreation Director. It was at these conferences where I heard this statement that stuck with me “You may have to go out, to go up.” Meaning I may have to leave Aberdeen to reach my goal of becoming a Parks and Recreation Director. I knew that was going to be tough, but if I ever wanted to accomplish my career goals, I had to be okay with this possibility. 

With excitement, I can say that I am now the Siler City Parks and Recreation Director. This new career path has its ups and downs though. I can tell you that it can be lonely at the top. I learned quickly that I’m not going to be everyone’s friend or make everyone happy. I am now the one who makes the big decisions that have multiple impacts. I am the one that is looked to for guidance. My phone rings every weekend and late at night with questions and concerns. I must be accessible 24 hours a day/ 7 days week, where before this wasn’t always the case.  

As an Athletic Coordinator, my primary focus was athletics. It was structured and ran like a well-oiled machine. As Parks and Recreation Director, my main focus is everything. I can’t focus on one aspect and allow others to fall by the way side. With athletics, I dealt primarily with a core group. Now I find myself in meetings and conversations with all different types of groups - all with different primary focus points. This career move was a huge jump in responsibility. I feel that this career move has matured me, not only as a park and recreation professional but as an individual.     

My advice for any parks and recreation professionals that may have a career goal of becoming a Parks and Recreation Director is to lean heavily on your supervisor. Let them know your career goals and ask them if you can take part in some of their day-to-day operations. This will let you really see what being a Parks and Recreation Director is all about. Attend conferences and learn as much as you can. Be okay with the statement “You may have to go out, to go up.” If you can do all these things and feel good about, it then GO FOR IT!!


Meet the Author

Joseph Keel was recruited in 2006 to Mars Hill University, where he became an everyday right-handed reliever out of the bullpen. He received his degree in Parks and Recreation Administration with a Minor in Business Administration in 2010. He graduated with a 3.5 GPA. After graduating, Joseph returned to the Carolina Mudcats, where he completed his internship the previous year. In July 2010, he took the Athletic Coordinator position for the Town of Aberdeen. Joseph was awarded the Young Professional Award by the NCRPA on September 15, 2016 at the Athletic Directors Workshop. In February 2017, Joseph accepted the Director of Parks and Recreation position with the Town of Siler City. Joseph enjoys playing golf, spending time at the beach, helping others and serving his church.

Joseph can be reached at jkeel@silercity.org or (919) 742-2699

If you are interested in being a guest author for the YPN Blog, please contact Nicole at nicole@ncrpa.net or 919-832-5868.

Tags:  involvement  professional development  young professionals  ypn 

Share |
Permalink
 

YPN Blog: January 2017

Posted By Katy Keller, Indian Trail Parks and Recreation, Thursday, January 5, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Hello Young Professionals!

My name is Katy Keller, and I work with Indian Trail Parks and Recreation as a Program Coordinator. In a previous blog, Jared Mull from Transylvania County talked about why and how to get involved at the NCRPA level. This month I am going to build off of that and talk about taking on leadership roles early in your career.

When taking on leadership roles, here are several things to consider:

1) Find your passion. What are you passionate about? What do you want to do? Where do you want to be in 10 years? I struggle with these questions. Honestly, how are you supposed to professionally say, “I don’t know the right answer to this question.”  Instead, focus on your values. Write down what is most important to you and stick with it. From there, create your vision and write down goals that can help you achieve it. Once you have these down, get invested. Stand behind your cause.

2) It’s not always about you. We have all heard that there is no “I” in team. When taking on leadership roles, it’s important to take a “team” stance. Your decisions are now based on what is best for the team versus what is best for you as an individual. Know your own strengths and weaknesses first and strive to enhance them. Communication is key. The way you speak to others is just as important as how others receive the information. Make sure that the message is not lost in the delivery.

3) Watch, listen and learn. Great leaders should always want to learn more. To better your team, you have to better yourself. If people are talking to you, truly listen to what they have to say before speaking. One of the biggest things that I have learned is observing how people react to situations – whether it’s a peer or more distinguished professional. Find a distinguished professional either in your department or in the field. Establish a connection and get their advice or watch how they react to situations. Learn from them. When it comes to learning, always continue to seek out knowledge whether it’s through a workshop, conference, or other professionals.

4. Be at the table. If you’re truly ready to take on a leadership role, it’s time to make your presence known. Speak up at meetings. You have to get invested and get involved. Whether it’s speaking up at a meeting, signing up to do a session at conference, or wanting to get more involved in the NCRPA Young Professionals Network. Sell yourself. Don’t like public speaking or even speaking up? Join the club. Amy Cuddy’s Tedx explains it best in Fake It Till You Make It.

Here are some great resources and tips on ways that you can get involved:

  • Jump on a monthly conference call (some examples listed below):
    • NCRPA Young Professionals Network – information can be found here.
    • NRPA Young Professionals Network – next meeting is January 19 at 2pm
  • Find a Mentor
    • Find a distinguished professional in your department or field and send them an email introducing yourself.
    • NCRPA YPNs along with NRPA YPNs typically have a “Take a Professional Out to Lunch” or a similar program that pairs you with a distinguished professional in the field. Take advantage of this!
  • NCRPA Forums
    • Have a question or need some resources? Ask through the NCRPA Forum! On the flip side, if you can answer any of the questions that are coming through, do so. Get your name out there and get involved.

Ultimately, it is your decision whether you choose to take on a leadership role. I encourage each of you to take the next step in speaking up because what you have to say matters. As young professionals, we are the future, and you should have a say in that. 


Meet the Author

Katy Keller is a Program Coordinator with Indian Trail Parks & Recreation. Katy is originally from Charlotte, North Carolina and received her B.S. degree in Recreation & Park Management from Appalachian State University. Katy has previously worked as a Recreation Specialist for Mecklenburg County Park & Recreation. In March 2015, she was hired by the Town of Indian Trail, where her main responsibilities include programming, marketing, and overseeing contracts. Katy is also the East Central Regional rep for the NRPA’s YPN State Associations Committee and is active in the NCRPA YPN with Student Outreach. Outside of work Katy enjoys spending time with her husband and keeping up with her two toddlers.

If you would like to contact Katy or get more involved in the NRPA YPN, Katy can be reached at kkeller@admin.indiantrail.org or 704-821-8114.

If you are interested in being a guest author for the YPN Blog, please contact Nicole at nicole@ncpra.net or 919-832-5868

Tags:  leadership  leadership roles  professional development  young professionals  ypn 

Share |
Permalink