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Why pursue a Certified Park and Recreation Professional (CPRP) certification?

Posted By Jason Tryon, Assistant Director of Parks & Recreation - Town of Indian Trail, Thursday, December 18, 2014

When asked why I pursued the Certified Park and Recreation Professional (CPRP) certification. My initial thought was; why not? I think it is my obligation as a recreation professional to seek as much knowledge and offerings as possible. To me, the CPRP was a chance to reflect on my experience, and take the passion I have for this field into recognition, in the form of certification.


The certification was motivation to prove to myself that I have gained a great deal of experience and knowledge over the last few years. I found the study guide to be extremely interesting, with topics that I have not dealt with in several years. This helped refresh my mind on how to pursue certain issues. After my first time reading through the study guide, I realized what areas I needed to focus on. This helped me not only for the exam, but also with day-to-day responsibilities.


I also decided to pursue certification as a level of dedication and acknowledgement. I hoped that this could show my employer and other departments the dedication I have and, hopefully, help my career path along the way. I have noticed more and more opportunities that are seeking the certification as a preferred accomplishment for candidates. Since obtaining my certification I have advanced my career and I believe that this was one of the deciding factors to my employer.


Not only that, I pursued the CPRP because I love the field of parks and recreation and hope to continue my career path. In order to pursue advancement I believe it is vital to pursue any certifications I can. This does not just stand true for the CPRP but also for specialized certifications as well, like the CPSI and AFO. 


The CPRP has helped me get involved on both a state and national level with several committees through contacts I have made with other professionals. CPRP has also helped me set an example to my staff. I recently had one staff member that I hired call me with such excitement to inform me of the same achievement. That moment was just as if not more exciting than obtaining the certification myself, it is a testament that what we do as recreation professionals can have an impact on not only our communities but our staff as well.

 Visit http://www.nrpa.org/cprp/ for more info on how you can pursue your CPRP. 


Tags:  CPRP  NCRPA  NRPA  Parks  Recreation  Tips  To-do 

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Excellent!
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